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Maneries

Luis Garay

Maneries [from Manare: spring form, emergence] works the body as linguistic material. Taking iconic, motivated and arbitrary signs, the performer builds and explores a series of tests on the limits of her formal capacities. These forms, having gone through time, constantly build, destroy and expose the body as producer of possible universes and perceptions over time.

biograph, last year was pretty//sh*tty

Findlay//Sandsmark

With a passing nod to Beckett’s Krapp’s Last Tape and a swipe at the age of selfies, this theater/dance performance examines the very moment something or someone is captured, recorded and then memorialized through technology. In an age where pictures and film are frequently doctored, Findlay//Sandsmark draw a line between the fragile image and the fallibility of memory.

Bronx Gothic

Okwui Okpokwasili and Peter Born

A solo creation at the intersection of theater, dance and visual art installation, Bronx Gothic gives palpable force to the charged relationship between two girls on the verge of adolescence in the 1980s—where Newports are bought in singles at corner bodegas, and sex-saturated notes are passed in class.  In a performance of psychic and physical collisions that threaten to break the body, it’s an unflinching look into the exquisite turbulence of one woman’s memory.

Predator Songstress

Degenerate Art Ensemble

A fierce band of Seattle-based artists presents an intensely visual, music-driven theatrical event. Predator Songstress is a modern-day fairy tale of an anti-heroine in search of her stolen voice, set in a world where the tools that are used to stifle and control are appropriated as means for individual realization. Prepare your eyes and ears for otherworldly visuals, gorgeous vocals, incredible costumes, merrily creepy earworms, and a singular butoh-meets-anime vision.

Beware of the Dandelions

Complex Movements
Beware of the Dandelions is a mobile art installation that functions as a performance, workshop space, and visual arts exhibition. The piece intersects disciplines including: community organizing, design, hip-hop and electronic music, architecture, and theater. This groundbreaking Detroit collective is changing our understanding of the relationship between art and progress in the 21st century.

When The Wolves Came In

Kyle Abraham / Abraham.In.Motion

Award-winning choreographer and performer Kyle Abraham presents an evening-length program of new work inspired by jazz great Max Roach’s We Insist Freedom Now.

Stripe Tease

Chris Schlichting

Crafting a deeply satisfying mix of patterns and set structures, large-scale spectacle and delicate intimacy, recurrence and surprise, Schlichting’s newest work Stripe Tease embraces and slyly subverts dance history. Schlichting creates a beautifully designed, meticulously constructed dance world combining movement, visual art, and music.

Thank You For Coming: Attendance

Faye Driscoll

In Thank you for Coming: Attendance, the premiere iteration in Driscoll’s three part series, performers pass through ever-morphing states of physical entanglement and scenes of distorted familiarity, building new bodies, new stories, and new ways of being around a constantly constructed and re-imagined group experience. Intimately staged in the round, Driscoll crafts a heightened reality of observation, invitation and interdependence.

Opposing Forces

Amy O'Neal

Opposing Forces utilizes tropes of contemporary performance to expose fears around the feminine in our culture through the hyper masculine dance style of Breaking. With curiosity, vulnerability, and power, five world-class B-Boys uncover binary perceptions of gender using a range of dance contexts: battling, commercial dance, and cyphering.

BLEED

Tere O'Connor

BLEED is a large work that encompasses O’Connor’s love of complexity and layering in dance. It is the culminating work of a two-year project during which he constructed three other pieces, Secret Marypoem and Sister, all from very different source material and each with an entirely different cast. He then collapsed these into this fourth work, simultaneously remembering and forgetting the previous dances. All 11 of the magical performers from the other works are here yet the movement material is gone.